March 15, 2007

virtual community


The internet is a wonderful thing. It expands ones sphere in communication and the sharing of information. It is a blessing and a curse. For me, entering the blogworld has been a very enlightening experience. I have exercised my mind to a healthy spot.. I hope. A year ago today my spiritual mind was pretty mushy. This may sound selfish but I blog mostly for myself. I admit it I am vain sometimes. I like to see my own thoughts written out or listen to my own recordings. Everybody's vain in one way or another whether they know it or not. On that note let me say that I think that it's okay if it's in a healthy measure.

God's spirit does speak through the blog and I can testify. At the same time I sense a danger within the virtual community phenomenon. While posting and commenting has exercised my thinker it has done me a great disservice in my development within the art of dialogue. Some may say I'm a good listener which may be true but part of it (percentage is up to the beholder) is because I find it easy to stumble over my own words therefore I shy from talking.

I wondered if the apostle Paul lived today would he blog? I think so! He would probably also see it's limitations as well. To me, nothing beats looking someone in the eye and seeing them smile(or not)and listening to their audible voice speak and physically sensing a human touch to boot(handshakes and hugs). Reading the word of God in a book or in a blog is great. Hearing it out loud is better.

Let's never forget to meet up with each other.... in person.... savvy?

9 comments:

mikeofearthsea said...

Listening (especially to others) is the most important skill we can develop. How I wish I were better at it.

carl said...

I wish I were too. I sometimes doze off. There was this one time a few years back, a lady was talking to me as I was just about to get in my car. I must of been multi-tasking or something because all I remember is saying "uh huh, uh huh, cool, uh huh, cool" and then suddenly she gently put her hand on my shoulder and firmly said to me "No Carl, it's not cool, I crashed my car into a telephone pole". Ouch! that stung me for awhile and I obviously remember it to this day. Though I can look back and laugh. That moment was a strong catalyst for me to grow as a listener.

IZenBet said...

do men tune things out better than women? do women make more of an effort to pay attention to the issue or straight out dismiss what someone says and tell them why?
i know there are exceptions but i find to be the case a lot that men are built problem solvers and women tend to listen and talk about stuff.

mikeofearthsea said...

Time for a new post....

You must have been co-opted by myspace - or busy with real life.

Or practicing for tonight's concert.

;-)

carl said...

izenbet ~ yeah, I agree. men are generally worse listeners than women.

mike/earth&sea ~ no, actually quite the opposite I've been on vacation and at home so I've had more time on my hands. my access to the internet has been mostly cut off.... oh well, it's really not that bad. reminds me of the 90's. :)

Steve Hayes said...

When I first discovered electronic communication (nearly 20 years ago now) I thought it could be a marvellous took to make face to face meetings more productive.

People would gather for conferences from all over the country (or all over the world), spend a few days together, and part, vowing to keep in touch, yes somehow they never did.

But 20 years on, I see that people STILL don't use electronic networking to prepare for and follow-up face-to-face meetings.

carl said...

wow! 20 years.

that is so true how the internet can be an empowering tool for real life and relationships.

Anonymous said...

I am certain St Paul would have been a blogger. And the internet, like everything else created by human beings, can be good or evil, not in itself, buut by how it is used. A wise person once told me that anything can be redeemed by God, so can the internet. I think that wise person was you Carl

carl said...

gee thanks. I'm very curious who you are mr./mrs. anonymous.